Exercise 1.2 Point 1

I really struggled to get myself motivated to start this exercise. I took pictures of shells , birds and flowers, all objects that can be placed in a frame easily.  I realised that I was looking for images that were too perfect and that was not the aim of the exercise.

For ease, I went in my garden and found a flower head that I used as a point. It had to be small otherwise it would be considered a shape within the frame.

POINT. As a basic element, a central place in an image that defines a position in space. Where the eye goes-this may be a point of contrast, a vanishing point of perspective, or a central object in the image.

The first image shows the small flower head as a point in the centre of the frame.  A ‘Bulls Eye’ shot is generally considered not pleasing to the eye. A point in the centre draws the eye to the centre of the frame and that’s it, the eye wont move around the image to see other details in the overall image.  Unless there is symmetry in the image a point in the centre is consider unappealing. There is no symmetry with this image.

The second image is the flower head is off-centre and is more dynamic than the centre composition. This is considered more visually pleasing for the eye as it moves around the image. It has negative space and your eye is drawn to the contrasting colour of the flower. It feels more balanced

In the third image, the flower head is placed too close to the edge of the frame. This image is unbalanced and feels like it was taken by accident and needs to be justified.

The flower head has two basic relationships with the frame. There are implied lines that are in proportion to its distance from each corner and the side. The other is the implied lines suggest a horizontal and vertical division of the frame.  These implied lines are not actual lines and they form ‘The Golden Mean’ or ‘The Rule of Thirds’ .

 

There are four points were these implied lines cross, upper right ,lower right, upper left , lower left. All these positions are away from the centre ( Bulls Eye position) in the frame and are considered pleasing to the eye.

The two best ‘Golden Mean’ spots are considered to be Upper Right and Lower Right intersection spots. This is because the eye is most likely to enter at the lower left hand corner of the frame and travels to the centre then to the Right Side of the frame to the point of interest. The eye movement is proven to do this due to the fact that this is how we have learnt to read,  left to right on a page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s